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Ain’t It Cool News Review - Strange Factories

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STRANGE FACTORIES - AINT IT COOL NEWS REVIEW - AMBUSH BUG

STRANGE FACTORIES, an indie surrealist film with some particularly weird clowny characters. Being a writer myself, I find myself fascinated with films/books about writers and their pursuit of the ever-elusive inspiration/ending/beginning of a story. Having experienced this feeling before in trying to come to the perfect ending, or having a great idea just on the tip of your brain is often times infuriating, sometimes inspirational, and other times nightmarish, depending on the situations surrounding the process of forming a story.

In STRANGE FACTORIES, metaphor and surrealist exploration are used in order to tell a story of a writer in search of an elusive tale that he just can’t seem to finish.

Much of the fun in STRANGE FACTORIES comes from finishing the story being the actual goal of the film, with characters from the story, and the acting troupe set to play in it then becoming crucial elements of the writer’s quest. Though every film must reach an eventual conclusion, to name the struggle to find that ending is something refreshingly meta, while still being empathetic to how difficult this process often is. As the characters from the story/actors playing them experience nightmarish visions and the hum of a distant factory haunts the writer’s every move, it makes someone sitting through this film experience what it is like to have writer’s block and may even serve as inspirational enough to loosen the blockage itself. So while the nightmarish visions are just that, which apropos to the placement of this review under the “Send in the Clowns” banner, includes many twisted takes on clowns and grimacing facades, this film not only frightens, but also inspires—neither of which are very easy to accomplish.

The film’s runtime is over three hours, leaving long pauses in the storyline set to establishing shots of the bizarre yet natural landscape. My fast forward finger was getting a little twitchy there every now and then, but the story and thematic conflict were interesting enough to keep it from acting up.

Filmed in black and white, with long pauses between Shakespearian-esque soliloquies, STRANGE FACTORIES may not be for the more literal-minded of horror fans. But fans of the theatrical side of performances, the technical side of writing, and the appreciators of the surreal and offbeat will find a lot of things to appreciate with STRANGE FACTORIES.

johnharrigan:

STRANGE FACTORIES - AINT IT COOL NEWS REVIEW - AMBUSH BUG
STRANGE FACTORIES, an indie surrealist film with some particularly weird clowny characters. Being a writer myself, I find myself fascinated with films/books about writers and their pursuit of the ever-elusive inspiration/ending/beginning of a story. Having experienced this feeling before in trying to come to the perfect ending, or having a great idea just on the tip of your brain is often times infuriating, sometimes inspirational, and other times nightmarish, depending on the situations surrounding the process of forming a story.
In STRANGE FACTORIES, metaphor and surrealist exploration are used in order to tell a story of a writer in search of an elusive tale that he just can’t seem to finish.
Much of the fun in STRANGE FACTORIES comes from finishing the story being the actual goal of the film, with characters from the story, and the acting troupe set to play in it then becoming crucial elements of the writer’s quest. Though every film must reach an eventual conclusion, to name the struggle to find that ending is something refreshingly meta, while still being empathetic to how difficult this process often is. As the characters from the story/actors playing them experience nightmarish visions and the hum of a distant factory haunts the writer’s every move, it makes someone sitting through this film experience what it is like to have writer’s block and may even serve as inspirational enough to loosen the blockage itself. So while the nightmarish visions are just that, which apropos to the placement of this review under the “Send in the Clowns” banner, includes many twisted takes on clowns and grimacing facades, this film not only frightens, but also inspires—neither of which are very easy to accomplish.
The film’s runtime is over three hours, leaving long pauses in the storyline set to establishing shots of the bizarre yet natural landscape. My fast forward finger was getting a little twitchy there every now and then, but the story and thematic conflict were interesting enough to keep it from acting up.
Filmed in black and white, with long pauses between Shakespearian-esque soliloquies, STRANGE FACTORIES may not be for the more literal-minded of horror fans. But fans of the theatrical side of performances, the technical side of writing, and the appreciators of the surreal and offbeat will find a lot of things to appreciate with STRANGE FACTORIES.
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johnharrigan:

STRANGE FACTORIES - AINT IT COOL NEWS REVIEW - AMBUSH BUG
STRANGE FACTORIES, an indie surrealist film with some particularly weird clowny characters. Being a writer myself, I find myself fascinated with films/books about writers and their pursuit of the ever-elusive inspiration/ending/beginning of a story. Having experienced this feeling before in trying to come to the perfect ending, or having a great idea just on the tip of your brain is often times infuriating, sometimes inspirational, and other times nightmarish, depending on the situations surrounding the process of forming a story.
In STRANGE FACTORIES, metaphor and surrealist exploration are used in order to tell a story of a writer in search of an elusive tale that he just can’t seem to finish.
Much of the fun in STRANGE FACTORIES comes from finishing the story being the actual goal of the film, with characters from the story, and the acting troupe set to play in it then becoming crucial elements of the writer’s quest. Though every film must reach an eventual conclusion, to name the struggle to find that ending is something refreshingly meta, while still being empathetic to how difficult this process often is. As the characters from the story/actors playing them experience nightmarish visions and the hum of a distant factory haunts the writer’s every move, it makes someone sitting through this film experience what it is like to have writer’s block and may even serve as inspirational enough to loosen the blockage itself. So while the nightmarish visions are just that, which apropos to the placement of this review under the “Send in the Clowns” banner, includes many twisted takes on clowns and grimacing facades, this film not only frightens, but also inspires—neither of which are very easy to accomplish.
The film’s runtime is over three hours, leaving long pauses in the storyline set to establishing shots of the bizarre yet natural landscape. My fast forward finger was getting a little twitchy there every now and then, but the story and thematic conflict were interesting enough to keep it from acting up.
Filmed in black and white, with long pauses between Shakespearian-esque soliloquies, STRANGE FACTORIES may not be for the more literal-minded of horror fans. But fans of the theatrical side of performances, the technical side of writing, and the appreciators of the surreal and offbeat will find a lot of things to appreciate with STRANGE FACTORIES.
ZoomInfo

johnharrigan:

STRANGE FACTORIES - AINT IT COOL NEWS REVIEW - AMBUSH BUG

STRANGE FACTORIES, an indie surrealist film with some particularly weird clowny characters. Being a writer myself, I find myself fascinated with films/books about writers and their pursuit of the ever-elusive inspiration/ending/beginning of a story. Having experienced this feeling before in trying to come to the perfect ending, or having a great idea just on the tip of your brain is often times infuriating, sometimes inspirational, and other times nightmarish, depending on the situations surrounding the process of forming a story.

In STRANGE FACTORIES, metaphor and surrealist exploration are used in order to tell a story of a writer in search of an elusive tale that he just can’t seem to finish.

Much of the fun in STRANGE FACTORIES comes from finishing the story being the actual goal of the film, with characters from the story, and the acting troupe set to play in it then becoming crucial elements of the writer’s quest. Though every film must reach an eventual conclusion, to name the struggle to find that ending is something refreshingly meta, while still being empathetic to how difficult this process often is. As the characters from the story/actors playing them experience nightmarish visions and the hum of a distant factory haunts the writer’s every move, it makes someone sitting through this film experience what it is like to have writer’s block and may even serve as inspirational enough to loosen the blockage itself. So while the nightmarish visions are just that, which apropos to the placement of this review under the “Send in the Clowns” banner, includes many twisted takes on clowns and grimacing facades, this film not only frightens, but also inspires—neither of which are very easy to accomplish.

The film’s runtime is over three hours, leaving long pauses in the storyline set to establishing shots of the bizarre yet natural landscape. My fast forward finger was getting a little twitchy there every now and then, but the story and thematic conflict were interesting enough to keep it from acting up.

Filmed in black and white, with long pauses between Shakespearian-esque soliloquies, STRANGE FACTORIES may not be for the more literal-minded of horror fans. But fans of the theatrical side of performances, the technical side of writing, and the appreciators of the surreal and offbeat will find a lot of things to appreciate with STRANGE FACTORIES.

Quote IconThe theaters of the future will be bigger and more beautiful than ever before. They will employ expensive presentation formats that cannot be accessed or reproduced in the home (such as, ironically, film prints). And they will still enjoy exclusivity, as studios relearn the tremendous economic value of the staggered release of their products.
The projects that most obviously lend themselves to such distinctions are spectacles. But if history is any guide, all genres, all budgets will follow. Because the cinema of the future will depend not just on grander presentation, but on the emergence of filmmakers inventive enough to command the focused attention of a crowd for hours.
These new voices will emerge just as we despair that there is nothing left to be discovered. As in the early ’90s, when years of bad multiplexing had soured the public on movies, and a young director named Quentin Tarantino ripped through theaters with a profound sense of cinema’s past and an instinct for reclaiming cinema’s rightful place at the head of popular culture.
Never before has a system so willingly embraced the radical teardown of its own formal standards. But no standards means no rules. Whether photochemical or video-based, a film can now look or sound like anything.
It’s unthinkable that extraordinary new work won’t emerge from such an open structure. That’s the part I can’t wait for.
Christopher Nolan, “Films of the Future Will Still Draw People to Theaters”. (via fuckyeahdirectors)

(Source: firstshowing.net)

johnharrigan:

Strange Factories bullseye - Scalarama Poster - Bristol Edition - 2014

Strange Factories screens as part of Scalarama and Heritage Open Days at the Curzon Community Cinema Clevedon on the 13th of September at 7pm. Tickets Available now.

“The production fuses the haunting, authentic dreamworlds of David Lynch
and the theatrical philosophies of Antonin Artaud….to create a vivid and
disturbing reality to powerfully draw in the audience.” — Nick Dawson,
Filmmaker Magazine Fall 2013 Issue